By Robert J. Rhee. Full text here. Shareholder primacy is one of the most fundamental concepts in corporate law and corporate governance. It is widely embraced in the business, legal, and academic communities. Economic analysis and policy arguments advance a normative theory that corporate managers should maximize shareholder wealth. Academic literature invariably describes shareholder primacy…

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Administrative Answers to Major Questions: On the Democratic Legitimacy of Agency Statutory Interpretation By Blake Emerson. Full text here. This Article critiques the legal and theoretical premises of the major questions doctrine, and proposes a revision to the doctrine that better comports with the institutional structure and ideological origins of our administrative state. The major…

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Corporate Charter Competition By Lynn M. LoPucki. Full text here. Corporate charter competition has dominated the corporate-law literature for four decades. This Article draws on the theoretical and empirical insights from that vast literature to present a systems analysis of the competition. The analysis shows the competition to be a system composed of three subsystems,…

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When Should Employers Be Liable for Factoring Biased Customer Feedback into Employment Decisions? By Dallan F. Flake. Full text here. In today’s customer-centric business environment, firms seek feedback from consumers seemingly at every turn. Firms factor customer feedback into a host of decisions, including employment-related decisions such as who to hire, promote, and fire; how…

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By Mike Sikora. Full text here In articulating the Mayo test for patentable subject matter under 35 U.S.C. § 101, the Supreme Court effectively replaced decades of judicial tests with a single streamlined analysis. Large-scale invalidations of software, business method, and communications patents swiftly followed, yet biotechnology patents have largely been spared. Even so, it may simply be…

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Note: Punishing the Pettifogger’s Practice: Applying the Sanction Power of 28 U.S.C. § 1927 to Law Firms By Joseph T. Janochoski. Full text here. The federal statute 28 U.S.C. § 1927 permits litigants to seek repayment of, and courts to sanction in the form of, “the excess costs, expenses, and attorneys’ fees reasonably incurred” as…

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Note: Left To Languish: The Importance of Expanding the Due Process Rights of Immigration Detainees By Maisie A. Baldwin. Full text here. Modern immigration detention in the United States is nearly indistinguishable from criminal detention—and often, the same facilities are used to house immigration and criminal detainees side by side. Detainees in both systems may…

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Rights-Weakening Federalism By Shitong Qiao. Full text here. This Article examines whether federalism protects land rights in China from two dimensions. I first compare national law with local institutions of eminent domain, revealing that local governments take much more land than the national government approves, frequently violating, tweaking, and challenging national law. I next examine…

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Foot Voting, Decentralization, and Development By Ilya Somin. Full text here. We can enhance development by making it easier for people to “vote with their feet” between jurisdictions. Foot voting is, in several crucial respects, a better mechanism of political decision-making than ballot-box voting. Foot voters generally have better incentives to acquire relevant knowledge—and use…

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Data and Decentralization: Measuring the Performance of Legal Institutions in Multilevel Systems of Governance By Kevin E. Davis. Full text here. Most countries rely on multiple levels of government, and many important legal institutions are subnational in scope. There are now several indicators that purport to measure the performance of legal institutions, but they tend…

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