By Meirav Furth-Matzkin & Cass R. Sunstein. Full text here. Social norms have been used to nudge people toward specified outcomes in various domains. But can people be nudged to support, or to reject, proposed government policies? How do people’s views change when they learn that the majority approves of a particular policy, or that…

Continue reading

By Jeremy W. Bock. Full text here. Existing proposals for enhancing predictability in patent claim interpretation focus primarily on the process of adjudication and doctrinal issues, while rarely delving into the underlying psychological and environmental factors that might influence different readers to interpret the same claim very differently. Drawing on lessons from behavioral economics and cognitive…

Continue reading

By Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer. Full text here. More than fifty countries around the world have sharply increased legal restrictions on domestic nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that receive funding from outside their home country and the foreign NGOs that provide such funding. These restrictions include requiring advance government approval before a domestic NGO can accept cross-border funding, requiring…

Continue reading

By Alexander Tsesis. Full text here. Primary and secondary school student speech cases raise a variety of conflicting concerns about civic growth, intellectual development, school discipline, and judicial discretion. This Article explains how courts should address the internal conflict within jurisprudence that, on the one hand, recognizes students retain their First Amendment rights, and, on the…

Continue reading

By Verity Winship & Jennifer K. Robbennolt. Full text here. Should agencies require admissions of wrongdoing from the targets of civil enforcement? Administrative agencies rely heavily on settlement as a key enforcement tool. Admissions of wrongdoing—or, more commonly, declarations that nothing is admitted—form part of these settlement agreements and the underlying negotiations. The Securities and…

Continue reading

By Christopher Serkin & Michael P. Vandenbergh. Full text here. Legal change has the potential to disrupt settled expectations and property rights. The Takings Clause protects some expectations by requiring compensation for the most significant costs of changes in the law. However, threats of takings claims and related claims of unfairness in political debates can discourage…

Continue reading

By Claire Williams. Full text here. Access to housing has been a central issue throughout much of the United States’ history. Both government and private actors furthered and reinforced segregated and substandard housing for people of color. From the time of its passage, the Fair Housing Act and antidiscrimination litigation has been an important tool for…

Continue reading

By Lauren Clatch. Full text here. Plea bargaining is a central feature of the American criminal justice system. Traditional legal scholarship on plea bargaining, influenced by the subdiscipline of law and economics, assumes that criminal defendants simply compare the two criminal sanctions being offered—the criminal charge and sentence in the plea bargain versus the criminal charge…

Continue reading

By Emily C. Atmore. Full text here. Would you rather protect employee rights or stimulate economic growth? It seems like an impossible choice. This is a dichotomy that has been debated by scholars and lawmakers throughout history. Most recently, this issue has arisen in the context of the so-called gig economy. The gig economy uniquely challenges…

Continue reading

By Gregory N. Mandel. Full text here. This Article presents an original dataset of (1) every intellectual property decision made by the Supreme Court; and (2) every intellectual property statute passed by Congress from 2002 to 2016. Analysis of the data reveals that the Court and Congress have been significantly at odds over intellectual property law…

Continue reading