By Allan Erbsen. Full text here. The Article is the first to systematically consider the Constitution’s identification, definition, and integration of the physical spaces in which it applies. Knowing how the Constitution addresses a particular problem often requires knowing where the problem arises. Yet despite the importance and pervasiveness of spatial references in the Constitution, commentators…

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By Monica Patel. Full text here. Trade preference programs lower trade barriers for developing countries and open opportunities in consumer-driven markets which, in turn, increases their trade and economic growth. One example of a trade preference program in the United States is the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program that provides duty-free treatment for about 4800…

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By Karen E. Nelson. Full text here. The sentencing of Bernard Madoff in 2008 closed a chapter in the saga of one of the most extensive and destructive Ponzi schemes in American history. But the fallout from the fraud is just beginning. While every investor in a Ponzi scheme suffers financially once the fraud is exposed,…

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By Justin Goetz. Full text here. Due process protections for defendants vary greatly between the numerous federal agencies vested with civil enforcement powers. Many of these agencies fail to provide defendants with basic safeguards, including the protections available in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure. As federal administrative agencies continue to increase both the scope of…

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By Margaret H. Lemos & Alex Stein. Full text here. Doctrine and scholarship recognize two basic models of enforcing the law: the comprehensive model, under which law enforcers try to apprehend and punish every violator within the bounds of feasibility; and the randomized model, under which law enforcers economize their efforts by apprehending a small number…

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By Hon. Richard D. Cudahy & Alan Devlin. Full text here. Despite receiving thorough analytic treatment from the judiciary and academy, and notwithstanding its sophisticated doctrine, antitrust law remains dogged by a profound incongruity, for precisely what the law condemns remains elusive. Certainly, there is widespread agreement that the antitrust laws exist to promote some…

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By Jeffrey A. Meyer. Full text here. Scores of federal criminal and civil statutes are “geoambig­uous”—they do not say whether they apply to conduct that takes place in foreign countries. This is a vital concern in an age of exploding globalization. The Supreme Court regularly cites a “presumption against extraterritoriality,” but just as often overlooks it…

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By David Zaring. Full text here. Although the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) in theory regulates government policymaking, the agency that is both among the oldest and, as the financial crisis has revealed, one of the most important, does not play by its rules. The Treasury Department is rarely sued for its administrative procedure, makes fewer rules than…

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By Nathaniel H. Nesbitt. Full text here. The Supreme Court’s decision in Boumediene v. Bush gave suspected terrorists at Guantánamo Bay access to a system in which federal judges in Washington, D.C. adjudicate the legality of their detention. While many, perhaps most, legal commentators praise Boumediene as a victory for individual rights, critics argue that the…

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