Rescued from the Grave and Then Covered with Mud: Justice Scalia and the Unfinished Restoration of the Confrontation Right

In drafting the Supreme Court’s decision in Crawford v. Washington, Justice Scalia brought back to life the Sixth Amendment’s Confrontation Clause. In Justice Scalia’s absence, Professor Richard D. Friedman sees the future development of the doctrine to be far from certain.

Read More :: View PDF

Playing Favorites? Justice Scalia, Abortion Protests, and Judicial Impartiality

By examining Justice Scalia’s First Amendment jurisprudence through the lens of abortion cases, Professor Daniel A. Farber comments on how judicial bias may have played a part in the Court’s decisions during this era.

Read More :: View PDF

Remembering Justice Antonin Scalia

Justice Scalia’s presence on the bench nearly matches his overall doctrinal contributions. Professor Alan B. Morrison comments on Justice Scalia’s minimal record upon appointment to the Supreme Court, the challenges he presented to lawyers at oral argument, his aversion to legislative history, and his tendency towards writing colorful dissenting opinions and predicting doom and gloom […]

Read More :: View PDF

Foreword: A Consequential Justice

When he visited the University of Minnesota in October 2015, Justice Scalia commented that Justice William Brennan was “the most influential Justice of the twentieth century.” Although their styles could not have been more different, Professor Robert A. Stein observes that both Justice Brennan and Justice Scalia will certainly be remembered as two of the […]

Read More :: View PDF


Minnesota Law Review is pleased to present a collection of essays on Justice Antonin Scalia’s impact on the Supreme Court. These essays aim to present a wide look at Justice Scalia’s many contributions to the Court during his decades on the Bench. While Justice Scalia was one of the most polarizing figures on the Court […]

Read More

The Dormant Commerce Clause Wins One: Five Takes on Wynne and Direct Marketing Association

October Term 2014 featured what is to date the most important state and local tax case since 1992’s Quill Corp. v. North Dakota.  In Comptroller v. Wynne, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed a state court decision holding unconstitutional Maryland’s refusal to grant a credit for taxes paid by a resident taxpayer to other states on […]

Read More :: View PDF

Outstanding Constitutional and International Law Issues Raised by the United States-Puerto Rico Relationship

This Article touches upon some issues of fundamental importance to the several million nationally disenfranchised United States citizens that reside in Puerto Rico. I write with a modicum of uneasiness as a result of the uncertain terrain on which the United States-Puerto Rico relationship presently finds itself, firstly, by reason of two cases that are pending resolution by the Supreme Court […]

Read More :: View PDF

© 2011-2016 Minnesota Law Review. All Rights Reserved.