By Claire Williams. Full text here. Access to housing has been a central issue throughout much of the United States’ history. Both government and private actors furthered and reinforced segregated and substandard housing for people of color. From the time of its passage, the Fair Housing Act and antidiscrimination litigation has been an important tool for…

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By Lauren Clatch. Full text here. Plea bargaining is a central feature of the American criminal justice system. Traditional legal scholarship on plea bargaining, influenced by the subdiscipline of law and economics, assumes that criminal defendants simply compare the two criminal sanctions being offered—the criminal charge and sentence in the plea bargain versus the criminal charge…

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By Emily C. Atmore. Full text here. Would you rather protect employee rights or stimulate economic growth? It seems like an impossible choice. This is a dichotomy that has been debated by scholars and lawmakers throughout history. Most recently, this issue has arisen in the context of the so-called gig economy. The gig economy uniquely challenges…

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By Gregory N. Mandel. Full text here. This Article presents an original dataset of (1) every intellectual property decision made by the Supreme Court; and (2) every intellectual property statute passed by Congress from 2002 to 2016. Analysis of the data reveals that the Court and Congress have been significantly at odds over intellectual property law…

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By Steven L. Schwarcz. Full text here. Domestic and international regulatory efforts to prevent another financial crisis have been converging on the idea of trying to end the problem of too big to fail—that systemically important financial firms take excessive risks because they profit from success and are (or at least, expect to be) bailed out…

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By Jonathan Remy Nash, J.B. Ruhl, & James Salzman. Full text here. How much will our budget be cut this year? This question has loomed ominously over regulatory agencies for over three decades. After the 2016 presidential election, it now stands front and center in federal policy. Yet very little is known about the fundamental…

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By Amandeep S. Grewal. Full text here. The 2016 presidential election brought widespread attention to a part of the Constitution, the Foreign Emoluments Clause, that had previously enjoyed a peaceful spot in the dustbin of history. That clause generally prohibits U.S. Officers from accepting emoluments from foreign governments, absent congressional consent. Several commentators believe that President…

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By Emily Berman. Full text here. According to both courts and commentators, the Fourth Amendment regulates the government’s collection of data, but not its use. That is to say, once data is lawfully in the government’s possession, the Constitution places no limits on how it is employed. I argue that we should reject this conventional wisdom…

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By Barry C. Feld. Full text here. During the 1980s and ’90s, state lawmakers shifted juvenile justice policies from a nominally offender-oriented rehabilitative system toward a more punitive and criminalized justice system. Punitive pretrial detention and delinquency dispositions had a disproportionate impact on minority youths. Notwithstanding the past two decades’ drop in serious youth crime and…

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