Print Issue Volume 90 - No. 2

Substantive Due Process as a Source of Constitutional Protection for Nonpolitical Speech

Present First Amendment doctrine presumptively protects anything within the descriptive category “expression” from government regulation, subject to balancing against countervailing government interests. As government actions during the present War on Terrorism have made all too clear, that doctrine allows intolerable suppression of political debate and dissent—the expressive activity most integral to our constitutional design. At […]

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A Theory of Copyright’s Derivative Right and Related Doctrines

Although many copyrighted works are close substitutes for other copyrighted works, there would be many more close substitutes of certain works in the absence of the derivative right, the exclusive right to create adaptations of a copyrighted work. Yet even the derivative right’s defenders identify the suppression of new expression as a cost of the […]

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Lawyers, Justice, and the Challenge of Moral Pluralism

Each year law students confront the same question in their professional responsibility classes: should lawyers represent clients who want to use the law to do something immoral? Legal scholars who have addressed this question fall into two main camps: traditionalists and social justice theorists. Traditionalists argue that lawyers should provide the public with morally neutral […]

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Review Essay, Unsubsidizing Suburbia

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Note, Meet Me at the (West Coast) Hotel: The Lochner Era and the Demise of Roe v. Wade

Long-standing constitutional precedents can be overturned when the original holdings have become “unworkable.” This principle, first articulated in Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey and repeated by now-Chief Justice Roberts in his confirmation hearings, provides a creative means for overturning the most controversial precedent of all: Roe v. Wade. While it is unclear what […]

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De Novo

  • The Algorithm Made Me Do It and Other Bad Excuses

    THE ALGORITHM MADE ME DO IT AND OTHER BAD EXCUSES: UPHOLDING TRADITIONAL LIABILITY PRINCIPLES FOR ALGORITHM-CAUSED HARM By: Rebecca J. Krystosek, Volume 101 Staff Member As the outputs of algorithms increasingly pervade our everyday lives—from wayfinding apps and search engine autofill results to investment advice and self-driving cars—we must also […]

  • All (Privacy) Is Not Lost

    ALL (PRIVACY) IS NOT LOST: ATTORNEYS GENERAL AND PRIVACY PROTECTION By: Mitchell Noordyke, Volume 101 Staff Member In March, the House and Senate voted to prevent portions of the FCC Privacy Rule from going into effect.[1] This rule would have required more demanding protocol from broadband internet access service and […]

  • Pot, Printz, and Preemption

    POT, PRINTZ, AND PREEMPTION: WHY STATES CAN “JUST SAY NO” TO JEFF SESSIONS AND THE CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT By: Franklin R. Guenthner, Volume 101 Staff Member Attorney General Jeff Sessions is not a fan of marijuana. Before assuming his role at the Department of Justice, the former Senator from Alabama […]


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