Print Issue Volume 92 - No. 5

Minimum Wages and Low-Wage Workers: How Well Does Reality Match the Rhetoric?

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Representing Low-Wage Workers in the Absence of a Class: The Peculiar Case of Section 16 of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Underenforcement of Minimum Labor Standards

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Counting What Matters: Privatization, People with Disabilities, and the Cost of Low-Wage Work

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The Publicization of Home-Based Care Work in State Labor Law

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Remedies for Undocumented Noncitizens in the Workplace: Using International Law to Narrow the Holding of Hoffman Plastic Compounds, Inc. v. NLRB

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Labor Law After Legalization

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How Wal-Mart Fights Unions

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Preemption and Civic Democracy in the Battle over Wal-Mart

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Note, A Mock Funeral for a First Amendment Double Standard: Containing Coercion in Secondary Labor Boycotts

The secondary boycott provision of the National Labor Relations Act prohibits labor unions from using coercive tactics to induce “neutral” parties to sever economic ties with others. Although the judiciary has failed to clearly delineate the concept of coercion, secondary labor picketing has been deemed categorically coercive and subject to interdiction without constitutional concern. In […]

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Note, Toward a Robust Separation of Powers: Recapturing the Judiciary’s Role at Sentencing

Twenty years ago, Congress fundamentally changed the procedure for sentencing criminal defendants in the federal system by creating the United States Sentencing Commission to promulgate the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. The Guidelines were an attempt to increase transparency and decrease disparities in criminal sentences. Unfortunately, as the Supreme Court recognized in United States v. Booker, the […]

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De Novo

  • Prison for the Innocent

    PRISON FOR THE INNOCENT: THE ‘NEWLY DISCOVERED EVIDENCE’ STANDARD THROUGH THE LENS OF NASH V. RUSSELL By: Alexa Ely, Volume 102 Staff Member Since 1989, there have been over 2,120 exonerations with nearly 18,450 years lost in prison by innocent men and women in the United States criminal justice system.[1] […]

  • “Transgender Need Not Apply”

    ‘TRANSGENDER NEED NOT APPLY’[1]: HOW THE SESSIONS MEMO THREATENS ESSENTIAL WORKPLACE PROTECTIONS FOR TRANSGENDER INDIVIDUALS By: Libby Bulinski, Volume 102 Staff Member On October 4th, 2017, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memorandum stating that Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act does not prohibit discrimination based on […]

  • Scandal in the NCAA

    SCANDAL IN THE NCAA: A FIDUCIARY TALE By: Andrew Escher, Volume 102 Staff Member Common wisdom holds that sports bring people together. In circumstances as varied as a Texas high school at a Friday night football game or an entire country during the Olympics, athletics gives disparate groups of people […]


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