HEADNOTES

Spring 2017: Volume 101

Heuristic Interventions in the Study of Intellectual Property

Professor Silbey expands on the work of Professor Burk by elaborating on three of Burk’s central points, while noting that Burk’s work serves as a crucial step in explaining intellectual property as a social practice.

Read More :: View PDF

Truth, Lies, and Power at Work

Professor Estlund discusses Professor Norton’s analysis on the collision of regulating the speech of employers with protecting employees, finding that Norton “makes a persuasive case that relative power should be and sometimes is relevant to the constitutionality of both speech restrictions and compelled disclosure of information.”  

Read More :: View PDF

A New Social Contract: Corporate Personality Theory and the Death of the Firm

In their article The Death of the Firm, June Carbone and Nancy Levit argue that, “the firm as entity is disappearing as a unit of legal analysis.” More specifically, they argue that by dismissing the corporation as a mere legal fiction and equating the rights of this legal fiction with the rights of its owners, […]

Read More :: View PDF

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Volume 101 - Issue 6

Not Found

No articles were found for this issue. Perhaps searching will help?

De Novo

  • Prison for the Innocent

    PRISON FOR THE INNOCENT: THE ‘NEWLY DISCOVERED EVIDENCE’ STANDARD THROUGH THE LENS OF NASH V. RUSSELL By: Alexa Ely, Volume 102 Staff Member Since 1989, there have been over 2,120 exonerations with nearly 18,450 years lost in prison by innocent men and women in the United States criminal justice system.[1] […]

  • “Transgender Need Not Apply”

    ‘TRANSGENDER NEED NOT APPLY’[1]: HOW THE SESSIONS MEMO THREATENS ESSENTIAL WORKPLACE PROTECTIONS FOR TRANSGENDER INDIVIDUALS By: Libby Bulinski, Volume 102 Staff Member On October 4th, 2017, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memorandum stating that Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act does not prohibit discrimination based on […]

  • Scandal in the NCAA

    SCANDAL IN THE NCAA: A FIDUCIARY TALE By: Andrew Escher, Volume 102 Staff Member Common wisdom holds that sports bring people together. In circumstances as varied as a Texas high school at a Friday night football game or an entire country during the Olympics, athletics gives disparate groups of people […]


© 2011-2016 Minnesota Law Review. All Rights Reserved.