HEADNOTES

Spring 2017: Volume 101

Heuristic Interventions in the Study of Intellectual Property

Professor Silbey expands on the work of Professor Burk by elaborating on three of Burk’s central points, while noting that Burk’s work serves as a crucial step in explaining intellectual property as a social practice.

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Truth, Lies, and Power at Work

Professor Estlund discusses Professor Norton’s analysis on the collision of regulating the speech of employers with protecting employees, finding that Norton “makes a persuasive case that relative power should be and sometimes is relevant to the constitutionality of both speech restrictions and compelled disclosure of information.”  

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A New Social Contract: Corporate Personality Theory and the Death of the Firm

In their article The Death of the Firm, June Carbone and Nancy Levit argue that, “the firm as entity is disappearing as a unit of legal analysis.” More specifically, they argue that by dismissing the corporation as a mere legal fiction and equating the rights of this legal fiction with the rights of its owners, […]

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blog

Dan’s Flaw

DAN’S [F]LAW: STATUTORY FAILURE TO ENFORCE ETHICAL BEHAVIOR IN CLINICAL DRUG TRIALS Noah Lewellen* I. INTRODUCTION Paul, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota, bursts into a lecture hall, loudly claims to see monsters sitting in the seats, and offers his services in slaying them. The police are called, and Paul is restrained and delivered […]

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Case Comment: Bhogaita v. Altamonte

EVERY DOG CAN HAVE HIS DAY IN COURT: THE USE OF ANIMALS AS DEMONSTRATIVE EXHIBITS Kyle R. Kroll, Volume 100, Online Managing Editor In Bhogaita v. Altamonte, the Eleventh Circuit recently decided whether to allow a dog in the courtroom as a demonstrative exhibit.[1] Although the case presented many serious issues regarding the Fair Housing […]

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Revisiting Water Bankruptcy

REVISITING WATER BANKRUPTCY IN CALIFORNIA’S FOURTH YEAR OF DROUGHT Olivia Moe, Volume 100, Managing Editor This spring, as “extreme” to “exceptional” drought stretched across most of California—indicating that a four-year streak of drought was not about to resolve itself[1]—Governor Jerry Brown issued an unprecedented order to reduce potable urban water usage by twenty-five percent.[2] In […]

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Defying Auer Deference

DEFYING AUER DEFERENCE: SKIDMORE AS A SOLUTION TO CONSERVATIVE CONCERNS IN PEREZ v. MORTGAGE BANKERS ASSOCIATION Nicholas R. Bednar, Volume 100, Lead Articles Editor* On March 9, 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States handed down its decision in Perez v. Mortgage Bankers Association.[1]F The Court overturned the D.C. Circuit’s decision in Paralyzed Veterans of […]

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Reporting: Patent Reform Primer

WHAT’S UNDER THE BRIDGE? A PATENT REFORM PRIMER Ann E. Motl, Volume 99, Online Managing Editor Just a few years after passing the most sweeping changes in patent law since 1952, Congress is considering patent reform again.[1] Whereas the America Invents Act of 2011 (AIA) focused heavily on patent examination, the proposed reform would alter patent […]

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Reporting: Rumble v. Fairview Health

RUMBLE V. FAIRVIEW HEALTH SERVICES: FEDERAL JUDGE HOLDS THAT THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT’S FRANKENSTEIN CIVIL RIGHTS PROVISION PROTECTS TRANSGENDER INDIVIDUALS Leah Tabbert, Volume 99, Staffer The federal judiciary has spent years teasing apart and examining the many provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA).[1] Yet amidst the excitement surrounding religious freedom,[2] congressional […]

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Reporting: FAA’s Commercial Drone Quandary

THE FAA’S AMAZON EXEMPTION SIGNALS A COMMERCIAL DRONE QUANDARY ON THE HORIZON Maxwell Mensinger, Volume 99, Staffer Last week, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granted Amazon a much anticipated but highly restrictive license to test its drone delivery program. The event prompted various responses. Some commentators found the FAA’s progress laudable, particularly considering its past […]

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Welcome to De Novo

For nearly one hundred years, the Minnesota Law Review has been a leader amongst academic legal publications. When Professor Henry J. Fletcher launched the journal in 1917, his goal was simple. It was to “contribute a little something to the systematic growth of the whole law.” Since then, the Law Review has done just that, […]

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De Novo

  • What the Tax Bill Means for Students

    WHAT THE “TAX CUTS AND JOBS ACT” MEANS FOR STUDENTS: DO WE WANT INCENTIVES OR SIMPLIFICATION? By: Melanie Pulles Benson, Volume 102 Staff Member The new House tax reform bill, the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (“Act”), significantly departs from the current tax code.[1] The Act alters the tax brackets, […]

  • Losing Bigly

    LOSING BIGLY: HOW THE ACLU’S COMPLAINT FORCED THE U.S. GOVERNMENT TO RELEASE ROSA MARIA By: David Racine, Volume 102 Staff Member On October 25, 2017, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) detained Rosa Maria Hernandez, a ten-year-old child with cerebral palsy who was recovering from an emergency surgery she endured […]

  • Silent and Ambiguous

    SILENT AND AMBIGUOUS: THE SUPREME COURT DODGES CHEVRON AND LENITY IN ESQUIVEL-QUINTANA V. SESSIONS By: David Hahn, Volume 102 Staff Member[1] Twenty-year-old Juan Esquivel-Quintana—a lawful permanent resident from Mexico—had consensual sex with his sixteen-year-old girlfriend.[2] This violated California’s statutory rape statute,[3] and he pled no contest in state court.[4] The […]


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