HEADNOTES

Summer 2016: Volume 100 - No. 1

Outstanding Constitutional and International Law Issues Raised by the United States-Puerto Rico Relationship

This Article touches upon some issues of fundamental importance to the several million nationally disenfranchised United States citizens that reside in Puerto Rico. I write with a modicum of uneasiness as a result of the uncertain terrain on which the United States-Puerto Rico relationship presently finds itself, firstly, by reason of two cases that are pending resolution by the Supreme Court […]

Read More :: View PDF

The Dormant Commerce Clause Wins One: Five Takes on Wynne and Direct Marketing Association

October Term 2014 featured what is to date the most important state and local tax case since 1992’s Quill Corp. v. North Dakota.  In Comptroller v. Wynne, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed a state court decision holding unconstitutional Maryland’s refusal to grant a credit for taxes paid by a resident taxpayer to other states on […]

Read More :: View PDF

CURRENT PRINT ISSUE

Volume 100 - Issue 5

Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: Celebrating 100 Volumes of the Minnesota Law Review

Read More :: View PDF

The Most-Cited Articles from the Minnesota Law Review

Read More :: View PDF

The United States Supreme Court (Mostly) Gives Up Its Review Role with Ineffective Assistance of Counsel Cases

Gideon v. Wainwright is arguably the most significant criminal justice decision in American history. Gideon’s recognition of indigent criminal defendants’ right to publicly funded counsel had an immediate and enormous impact on the fate of defendants nationwide. Despite the widely acknowledged problems with providing adequate representation in the years since Gideon, succeeding on ineffective assistance […]

Read More :: View PDF

Culture as a Structural Problem in Indigent Defense

Indigent defense lawyers today are routinely overwhelmed by excessive caseloads, underpaid, inadequately supported, poorly trained, and left essentially unsupervised. The result is a serious cultural problem in indigent defense, especially in jurisdictions where such defense is handled by lawyers lacking the community and institutional reinforcement that strong public-defender offices can provide. Consequently, many indigent defendants […]

Read More :: View PDF

Prosser’s The Fall of the Citadel

William L. Prosser’s The Fall of the Citadel (Strict Liability to the Consumer) was simultaneously an analysis of the dismantling of the barriers to the imposition of strict liability for product-related injuries, an account of the sudden adoption of this form of liability beginning in the early 1960s, and a record of Prosser’s own intellectual […]

Read More :: View PDF

The Remains of the Citadel (Economic Loss Rule in Products Cases)

Though its seeds may have been planted long before, the economic loss rule in products liability tort law emerged in full force at the very same moment as the doctrine of strict products liability in the mid-1960s. This moment, fueled by the fall of privity and the rise of implied warranty earlier in the century, […]

Read More :: View PDF

Perspectives on the Fourth Amendment Forty Years Later: Toward the Realization of an Inclusive Regulatory Model

The Minnesota Law Review published Anthony Amsterdam’s celebrated Holmes Lectures just over forty years ago. Those lectures defended a normative, or at least very generally historical approach to the definition of “searches and seizures,” and a “regulatory model” as opposed to an “atomistic model” for assessing when “searches and seizures” are reasonable or “unreasonable.” Fourth […]

Read More :: View PDF

De Novo

  • Dan’s Flaw

    DAN’S [F]LAW: STATUTORY FAILURE TO ENFORCE ETHICAL BEHAVIOR IN CLINICAL DRUG TRIALS Noah Lewellen* I. INTRODUCTION Paul, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota, bursts into a lecture hall, loudly claims to see monsters sitting in the seats, and offers his services in slaying them. The police are called, and […]

  • Case Comment: Bhogaita v. Altamonte

    EVERY DOG CAN HAVE HIS DAY IN COURT: THE USE OF ANIMALS AS DEMONSTRATIVE EXHIBITS Kyle R. Kroll, Volume 100, Online Managing Editor In Bhogaita v. Altamonte, the Eleventh Circuit recently decided whether to allow a dog in the courtroom as a demonstrative exhibit.[1] Although the case presented many serious […]

  • Revisiting Water Bankruptcy

    REVISITING WATER BANKRUPTCY IN CALIFORNIA’S FOURTH YEAR OF DROUGHT Olivia Moe, Volume 100, Managing Editor This spring, as “extreme” to “exceptional” drought stretched across most of California—indicating that a four-year streak of drought was not about to resolve itself[1]—Governor Jerry Brown issued an unprecedented order to reduce potable urban water […]


© 2011-2016 Minnesota Law Review. All Rights Reserved.